The Socratic Method: Teaching by Asking Instead of by Telling via Rick Garlikov

Abstract

The following is a transcript of a teaching experiment, using the Socratic method, with a regular third grade class in a suburban elementary school. I present my perspective and views on the session, and on the Socratic method as a teaching tool, following the transcript. The class was conducted on a Friday afternoon beginning at 1:30, late in May, with about two weeks left in the school year. This time was purposely chosen as one of the most difficult times to entice and hold these children’s concentration about a somewhat complex intellectual matter. The point was to demonstrate the power of the Socratic method for both teaching and also for getting students involved and excited about the material being taught. There were 22 students in the class. I was told ahead of time by two different teachers (not the classroom teacher) that only a couple of students would be able to understand and follow what I would be presenting. When the class period ended, I and the classroom teacher believed that at least 19 of the 22 students had fully and excitedly participated and absorbed the entire material. The three other students’ eyes were glazed over from the very beginning, and they did not seem to be involved in the class at all. The students’ answers below are in capital letters.

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The advantages using of music at education of children

Music is a powerful source of communication because it has the ability to reach anyone and everyone. Quite like nothing else, exposure to music on a regular basis allows people of any age, gender, with or without learning difficulty, deafness, blindness or other disability, to experience its effects in some way. By the way, Music is usually associated with being something you listen to with your ears, there are a series of pitches that can also be felt by touch, such as the vibrations caused when a drum is played which can be of great benefit to children.

Music promotes relaxation
In the past, music has been used with good success in supporting all kinds of emotional, cognitive and social development needs across the world. Music has also been known to promote wellness by managing stress levels, boosting memory and improving communication.The good thing about music is that it can also be used to help children to relax as it uses a certain amount of discipline and structure So music can help with that and offer some kind of control to a child’s body movement and coordination, reduce anxiety and improve behaviour.
Music also encourages social interactions. Most of us find that increased exposure to music helps children to respond to vocals and voices around them more frequently when it is being played interactively – in some cases music has been known to get their attention where many other attempts fail which makes it a potentially therapeutic tool. (more…)

Major 7 Styles of Learning.Which one is appropriate for you ?

Learning styles, particularly Howard Gardner’s version of them, make sense intuitively, and have been very popular with K-12 educators. However, as others have mentioned here, there is no evidence that supports them. They are a wonderful idea, but people just don’t learn the way Howard Gardner describes. I think educators cling to them because they do encourage the development a variety of teaching methods that are more fun and engaging than the typical lecture-based approach to education.

You love to learn. Your students, colleagues, and parents love to learn. But what types of styles of learning are most effective for each party? Surely there is no one-size-fits-all approach to learning. After all, we’re seeing a dramatic increase in the number of learning tools made available and they cover an array of learning styles.Read through the following infographic to get a detailed look at the 7 styles of learning. (more…)

What makes a good EFL teacher?

What makes a good EFL teacher?

“How long is a piece of string?” springs to mind but the answer may be much simpler than you think, because you probably tick many of the boxes already. You’re probably asking this question because you are already or soon plan to be an EFL teacher. This means that you probably like working with people, that you prefer variety to routine, and that you are don’t mind taking calculated risks. As a rule,Teaching English as a Foreign Lnguage is one of the most satisfying jobs you can do because the vast majority of learners are highly-motivated, so all you need to do is try to recognise which aspect of your teaching skills needs to be used at any given time.
Below are some suggestions about the different roles you’ll find yourself playing – all of which combine to make a good teacher.
The Party Host
This job is about getting people chatting and communicating as much as possible, so a good EFL teacher needs to be approachable and create a friendly atmosphere in which plenty of communication can take place. At times this means you are more of a facilitator, rather like the host at a party, making sure each class member interacts with the others. You should organise and set up activities whereby the class get to know one another and talk freely about their opinions and their lives, just as they would if they met through a mutual friend. As any good host would, once they get chatting, just stand back and quietly observe; only join in when the conversation dries up. This minimizes your ‘Teacher Talking Time’ and maximises ‘Student Talking Time’, which is one of your main goals as a teacher. You simply need to have a great big smile on your face and a welcoming attitude towards your class members. (more…)