The Socratic Method: Teaching by Asking Instead of by Telling via Rick Garlikov


The following is a transcript of a teaching experiment, using the Socratic method, with a regular third grade class in a suburban elementary school. I present my perspective and views on the session, and on the Socratic method as a teaching tool, following the transcript. The class was conducted on a Friday afternoon beginning at 1:30, late in May, with about two weeks left in the school year. This time was purposely chosen as one of the most difficult times to entice and hold these children’s concentration about a somewhat complex intellectual matter. The point was to demonstrate the power of the Socratic method for both teaching and also for getting students involved and excited about the material being taught. There were 22 students in the class. I was told ahead of time by two different teachers (not the classroom teacher) that only a couple of students would be able to understand and follow what I would be presenting. When the class period ended, I and the classroom teacher believed that at least 19 of the 22 students had fully and excitedly participated and absorbed the entire material. The three other students’ eyes were glazed over from the very beginning, and they did not seem to be involved in the class at all. The students’ answers below are in capital letters.


The advantages using of music at education of children

Music is a powerful source of communication because it has the ability to reach anyone and everyone. Quite like nothing else, exposure to music on a regular basis allows people of any age, gender, with or without learning difficulty, deafness, blindness or other disability, to experience its effects in some way. By the way, Music is usually associated with being something you listen to with your ears, there are a series of pitches that can also be felt by touch, such as the vibrations caused when a drum is played which can be of great benefit to children.

Music promotes relaxation
In the past, music has been used with good success in supporting all kinds of emotional, cognitive and social development needs across the world. Music has also been known to promote wellness by managing stress levels, boosting memory and improving communication.The good thing about music is that it can also be used to help children to relax as it uses a certain amount of discipline and structure So music can help with that and offer some kind of control to a child’s body movement and coordination, reduce anxiety and improve behaviour.
Music also encourages social interactions. Most of us find that increased exposure to music helps children to respond to vocals and voices around them more frequently when it is being played interactively – in some cases music has been known to get their attention where many other attempts fail which makes it a potentially therapeutic tool. (more…)

The Benefits of Minority Teachers in the Classroom

The Benefits of Minority Teachers in the Classroom

By Anna Egalite & Brian Kisida

he shooting of an unarmed Black teenager by a white police officer in Ferguson, Missouri in August 2014 sparked protests across the nation and prompted calls for greater minority representation in the police force, city governments, local school boards, the teacher labor force, and other positions of authority. Racial representation in the classroom is of particular interest to education practitioners, policymakers, and parents. Many believe that minority teachers are best situated to counter negative stereotypes and to serve as role-models, mentors, or cultural-translators for students of color. Moreover, teachers who can relate to their students’ cultural background should be less likely to hold biased subjective views of their academic abilities.

In 2014, ethnic minorities constituted a majority of America’s public school students for the first time, with projections showing that the proportion of minority students will continue to grow for years to come.


Major 7 Styles of Learning.Which one is appropriate for you ?

Learning styles, particularly Howard Gardner’s version of them, make sense intuitively, and have been very popular with K-12 educators. However, as others have mentioned here, there is no evidence that supports them. They are a wonderful idea, but people just don’t learn the way Howard Gardner describes. I think educators cling to them because they do encourage the development a variety of teaching methods that are more fun and engaging than the typical lecture-based approach to education.

You love to learn. Your students, colleagues, and parents love to learn. But what types of styles of learning are most effective for each party? Surely there is no one-size-fits-all approach to learning. After all, we’re seeing a dramatic increase in the number of learning tools made available and they cover an array of learning styles.Read through the following infographic to get a detailed look at the 7 styles of learning. (more…)